Archive Researchers

Featuring: Richard Wiseman, London


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How did you become an archive researcher?

Up until around ten years ago, I was a print journalist – which I guess may give you a good insight into research, fact-checking and putting a story together?

A friend of mine, and a fellow ‘keyboard warrior’, who also happened to own a TV production company, asked me if I’d like to produce some of his programmes, to which I could only reply “But I don’t know how any of this works. And what’s an Avid machine?” To which he replied, unforgettably, “Well, it’s all rather similar to what you’re used to working with, really. It’s all words and pictures, again – you’ll pick it up as you go along”.  (more…)

Archive Researchers

Featuring: Alba Toajas, Madrid


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You are quite new in the archival research world. What made you want to become an archive researcher in the first place?

I have always been into art, cinema and theatre. In 2006 I realized I wanted to become a librarian, and in 2010 I decided to specialise in audiovisual research. Research, documentation and cinema: the perfect combination, I love my job!  (more…)

Archive Researchers

Featuring: Jim Anderson, Manchester


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You have an incredible amount of experience in archival research and production. How did you end up in this field in the first place?

Well, the reason I started in this field was because I was working on the BBC Fantasy Football League a Friday night topical programme where I had to find footage material every week. I started with a blank page on Monday and by Friday we had a show! I had to find funny clips like old TV programs, commercials etc. Famous guests would come on the show to discuss football topics. I did this for 3 years and helped produce over 50 programs! I also worked on a Feature Film starring Colin Firth and Mark Strong called Fever Pitch also about football. Since 1990’s-2007, I had mostly been working as an assistant producer and producer director. After 2007 the work coming my way always involved finding and clearing archive. Although I am very busy it’s a good line of work dealing with wide variety of topics from the cold war to sports. I would like to return to producing and directing too -probably an archive based production.  (more…)

Archive Researchers

Featuring: Lisa Savage, Sydney


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You have been working with archives since 1990. How did you first become an archive researcher and producer?

I was working as a recruiter in a temp agency for the entertainment industry and I was useless! My boss asked me where I would like to work, what I would like to do so I said I’d like to work in the television industry. There was a job opening for a film researcher on a program called Beyond 2000. I went to the interview, got the job and 5 years later I went freelance.  (more…)

Archive Researchers

Featuring: Matthew Sanger, London


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You have been an archive researcher for many projects since the late 90s. How did you become an archive researcher, and what has been your favorite project so far?

I became an archive researcher quite by accident – I was working with a production company in 1996 logging rushes for a BBC series about the Prohibition era and the director/producer asked if I could also source, log and license the stills for the series. After that I worked as a stills researcher on a few other productions and also ventured into researching archive footage. I have always been a film buff so it seemed a natural vocation rather than an accidental career move. It’s difficult to give a favorite project as I’ve worked on so many – so here’s a few of the most memorable – working on three series of the cult Channel 4 series –Eurotrash was fun and an eye-opener, Jonathan Ross’ BBC3 series – Japanorama about Japanese popular culture was fascinating.  (more…)