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The Right Footage

‘I Am Not Your Negro,’ Archive Footage and Race in America


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A historical documentary with contemporary echoes

I Am Not Your Negro was conceived after Gloria Karefa-Smart (born Gloria Esther Baldwin) had handed a letter over to Haitian filmmaker Raoul Peck. The letter from her brother, famous African-American writer James Baldwin, to his literary agent spoke of the manuscript he was working on entitled Remember This House. The text aimed to shed light on the Civil Rights era, one of the greatest struggles in American history and focused on three of its leaders and friends of Baldwin: Medgar Evers, Martin Luther King Jr., and Malcolm X. The thirty-page memoir remained unfinished as Baldwin passed away on December 1987.  (more…)

The Right Footage

Tribeca Film Festival Announces 2017 Documentary Lineup


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Tribeca debuts unseen footage of the 1992 L.A. riots

Twenty-five years after the Rodney King verdict, Tribeca 2017 kicks off this weekend with searing archival news images and unseen footage of the 1992 LA riots with the world premiere of LA 92.  Academy Award co-directors and co-cinematographers Dan Lindsay and T.J. Martin of Undefeated are back again to narrate the unforgettable beating of Rodney King and the riots that ensued costing more than $1 billion dollars in damage and fifty lives.  Opting against voiceovers, the film seamlessly strings together archive footage, sound bites from politicians, and unseen on-the-ground videos from 1992 that make for a staggering account of the riots.  As a National Geographic world release, LA 92 is just one of the big name films that Tribeca enthusiasts have been anticipating.  (more…)

The Right Footage

Eight Days a Week: An Interview with Matt White


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Matt White is the Managing Partner of Sutton Hoo Studios, a production company specializing in the development of historical documentaries from distressed analog archival artifacts.  He founded the WPA Film Library in 1986, and has held senior management positions at National Geographic TV & Film and The Corporation of Public Broadcasting, where he was responsible for The American Archive initiative. He was a founder and the first President of ACSIL, a global association of leading film & video archives, and also a founding committee member of the United Nation’s initiative “Archives at Risk”, which advocates for the preservation of distressed audio-visual archives throughout the world. A prolific archive producer himself, White recently led the massive 10-year-long, worldwide archive research effort for the 2016 documentary “The Beatles: Eight Days a Week” directed by Ron Howard – an innovative project driven by rare footage sourced from all over the world.  (more…)